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LT  Charles S. BAYHA

UNIT: 349th BOMB Sqdn POSITION: CP

Lt. Charles S. Bayha (photo courtesy of Laura Shivers)

SERIAL #: O-776218 STATUS: POW
MACR: 12892 CR: 12892

Comments1: 3 MAR 45 BRUNSWICK

COMMENTS & NOTES

MEMO 1:

CREW

1ST LT JEAN (Jack) V. DePLANQUE               P FEH                                                                                  sn# O-791917
2ND LT CHARLES S. BAYHA                      CP POW 03 MAR 45 BRUNSWICK (flying with Lt Thrasher Crew)      sn# O-776218
   F/O   CHARLES B. BENYUNES                NAV CPT  03 APR 45 KIEL                                                           sn# T-127410
2ND LT STANLEY A. RABINOWITZ            BOM RFS  MEDICAL REASONS                                                      sn# O-776796
 T/SGT RAYMOND C. KOWALSKI              ROG FEH                                                                                   sn# 36854767
 T/SGT JOSEPH KOSIK                          TTE FEH                                                                                     sn# 33435727
    SGT STANLEY P. CARSON                  BTG KIA 31 DEC 44 HAMBURG (with the Blackman crew)                 sn# 37685440
    SGT HAROLD SMITH                          WG FEH                                                                                    sn# 14001294
    SGT KING M. WELDON                       WG POW  14 FEB 45 CHEB, CZECH with 390th BG                          sn# 18233225
 T/SGT KENNETH L. CRISPIN, JR.                TG FEH                                                                                  sn# 19206929

418th Sqdn..  Crew as above joined the 100th BG 22 Sep 1944
Crew flew a new B-17G from Lincoln Nebraska to Wales in Scotland.  Arrived England on September 16, 1944 Once at Thorpe Abbotts, Crew trained (practice missions and familarization flights) for about 2 weeks before they flew their first mission.

Lt. Strom Rhode flew last part of his tour with this crew.
Lt. DePlanque flew crew home via Dakar/ Natal/ Palm Beach
Sgt King Weldon removed at crew reduction (nine), he was transferred to 390th Bomb Group spare gunners pool 

From: louis.hensgens@home.nl
To: mpfaley@aol.com
Sent: 7/13/2010 2:59:02 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time
Subj: KIng M Weldon 418th

Hello,
My name is Louis Hensgens, I’m  from The Netherlands. I did adopt the grave of a fallen American airman at the American Cemetery and Memorial in Margraten, The Netherlands. His name is Staff Sergeant Louis S Prangl, waist gunner. He was a member of crew # 30 Gaik (569th Bomb Squadron, 390th BG, Heavy). I do a large research for all the men who flew with this crew on their 21 missions from September 1944 till the fatal day February 14, 1945. In the last 2 years I did find many families of fallen crewmembers and also several still living veterans. These veterans flew with crew # 30 Gaik for 1 or 2 missions. 1 person was at first member of the 100th BG (418th BS) before he became a part of crew # 30 Gaik of the 390th BG. His name is King M Weldon of Corpus Christi, Texas. His ASN is 18233225; he flew with crew # 30 Gaik on their last 3 missions and befor these 3 missions he did 1 mission with another crew of the 390th BG. (January 20, 1945 till February 14, 1945). King M Weldon was 1 of the 2 survivors of the crash near Wiesbaden, Germany. He became POW and was liberated at the end of the war. He died in 1967 in his hometown Corpus Christi. After the war King M did visit all the families of his 7 fallen crewmembers; he told their families what happened on that fatal day in February 1945. I know that the families did appreciate this very much!! What a great man!

The MACR is # 12350.
Date of crash: February 14, 1945 on way home from a mission to Cheb, Czechoslavakia
Crew # 30 of pilot 1LT Leonard J Gaik
569th BS, 390th BG, Heavy 
6 KIA, 1 MIA (the Ball Turret, position of hit by flak) and 2 survivors/POW (King M Weldon and Harold C Flanigan)
***************************************************************************************************************
Daniel L. McKeen (CP) from the Appleton crew flew some missons with this crew, perhaps to replace C.S. Bayha.

2nd Lt Stanley Rabinowitz sn# 0-776-796 was wounded by flak on his 8th mission. After many weeks in the hospital, he returned to flight duty.  He flew 9 additional missions, each with a different crew, usually as a deputy lead.  In all, he flew 17 missions.  On his 17th mission his leg was reinjured and he was sent too a convalescent Hospital in N.Y. He spent 3 months there for treatment and was discharged.  (Stanley Rabinowitz 2000 mpf)
****************************************************************************************************************

MISSIONS FROM T/SGT RAYMOND KOWALSKI: ROG AND T/SGT KENNETH CRISPIN-TG   (mpf 2001 & 2010) (NOTES FROM T/SGT KEN CRISPIN, LENGTH OF MISSION FROM KOWALSKI)

1. 09/10/44 WIESBADEN/MAINZ                                                                        6:00HRS
2. 12/10/44 BREMEN  FW PLANT                                                                   7:10HRS 
3. 17/10/44 COLOGNE                                                                                     7:15HRS
4. 18/10/44 KASSEL  FORCED DOWN IN LIEGE, BELGIUM, EVERYONE OK            7:20HRS
5. 30/10/44 MERSEBURG  CALLED BACK, BUT DEEP ENOUGH AND GOT CREDIT.  5:00HRS
6. 02/11/44 MERSEBURG  ROUGH ONE BUT HIT IT THIS TIME.  OIL, WE WERE LEAD CREW NOW.  I WAS TAIL GUNNER ON THE 
                     CREW   AND THE PILOT 1ST LT DePLANQUE WANTED ME TO STAY BACK THERE AS FORMATION CONTROL PERSON.  I 
                     RECEIVED THE RANK OF T/SGT.  WE HAD A RADAR OFFICER  AND ALWAYS HAD A COMMANDING OFFICER AS CO-PILOT.  OUR
                      CO-PILOT AND BALL TURRET GUNNER WENT TO ANOTHER CREW.      8:00HRS
7. 05/11/44 LUDWIGSHAVEN CHEMICAL AND OIL, ROUGH                                   7:15HRS
8. 10/11/44 WIESBADEN  ONLY SQUADRON IN OUR GROUP TO GO OVER THE TARGET, FOR SOME REASON, GOT THE HELL SHOT OUT
                      OF US, THE BOMBARDIER GOT HIT IN THE LEG AND I GOT A SMALL PIECE ON MY HAND.  I WAS OK, R&R ETC.   7:15HRS
9.   24/12/44 BIBLIS   AIRFIELD SOMEWHERE OVER FRONT LINES, CHRISTMAS EVE, PRETTY ROUGH                              9:30HRS
10. 31/12/44 HAMBURG  NEW YEARS EVE, OIL, REALLY ROUGH, LOTS OF FLAK AND ENEMY FIGHTERS  DePlanque also flew Lead in "C" 
                        Group  December 31, 1944 mission to Hamburg with Col. Wooten as Command Pilot.                                        8:30HRS
11. 03/01/45 FULDA                                             8:15HRS
12. 04/01/45 FRANKFURT                                    10:00HRS
13. 17/01/45 HAMBURG                                        7:30HRS
14. 20/01/45 HIELBRONN                                      8:00HRS
15. 29/01/45 KASSEL                                           7:15HRS
16. 09/02/45 WEIMAR                                          7:30HRS
17. 14/02/45 CHEMNITZ                                       8:45HRS
18. 17/02/45 FRANKFURT                                     6:30HRS  FORCED DOWN IN BELGIUM AGAIN
19. 07/03/45 SIEGEN                                           7:45HRS
20. 09/03/45 FRANKFURT                                     7:15HRS
21. 12/03/45 SWINEMUNDE                                  8:45HRS
Capt. DePlanque flew the Lead to Swinemunde 12 March 1945 with Major Harry Cruver (351st Commanding Officer) as Command Pilot. 

 Command Pilot          Major Harry Cruver
 Pilot                       Capt. J.V. DePlanque
 Co-Pilot (Tail Observer) Lt. D.L. McKeen
 Navigator                  Lt. R.E. Kirby
 Radar Navigator         Lt. S.C. "Storm": Rhode
 Bombardier               Lt. C.H. Svendson
 Command Navigator     Lt. W.P. Klinikowski
 Radio Operator          T/Sgt R.C, Kowalski
 Engineer                  T/Sgt J. Kosik
 Waist Gunner            S/Sgt Harold Smith
 Waist Gunner            T/Sgt K.L. Crispin

22. 19/03/45 JENA                                               8:00HRS
23. 21/03/45 PLAUEN                                           8:00HRS 
24. 23/03/45 UNNA                RAIL YARDS       7:00HRS
25. 24/03/45 ZIEGENHAIN         AIRFIELD
26. 04/04/45 KIEL                  SUB YARDS        7:20HRS
27. 06/04/45 LEIPZIG               RAIL YARDS        9:00HRS
28. 14/04/45 BORDEAUX/ROYAN NAVY GUNS        4:00HRS
29. 17/04/45 AUSSIG               RAIL YARDS        9:00HRS   

CHOWHOUND MISSIONS
MAY 2, 1945 SHIPOL AF   MAJ STAPLES-418TH CO, CAPT DEPLANQUE-LEAD PILOT,  LT CROTTY-LEAD NAVIGATOR
MAY 5, 1945 ALKMAAR, AF, HILVERSUM, BAARN, ,MAJ  LYSTER-350TH CO, CAPT. DEPLANQUE-LEAD PILOT,  LT BOROVILOS-LEAD NAVIGATOR
*************************************************************************************************************
Lt Charles Bayha 

CREW
2nd Lt Jack W.Thrasher        P  KIA  3/3/45  BRUNSWICK
2nd Lt Ernest F.Coble,Jr.     CP  NOC                                           A/C #44 8220
2nd Lt Gerald A.Rimmel     NAV  POW 3/3/45  BRUNSWICK            MACR #12892,Microfiche #4704
   Cpl Thomas C.Browning   TTE  POW 3/3/45  BRUNSWICK
   Cpl Albert L.Egsieker       ROG  POW 3/3/45  BRUNSWICK             TAPS: 25 MAR 1970
   Cpl Alfred S.Collins        BTG  NOC                                              TAPS: 13 DEC 1971
   Cpl George E.Mensler  NG/TOG  NOC                                              TAPS: 1985
   Cpl Joseph E.Turrenne     WG  NOC
   Cpl Cecil A.Baker              TG  KIA 3/3/45  BRUNSWICK

349th Sqdn. This crew,as above,joined the 100th Group on 3/12/44.

On board the A/C on 3/3/45  were:Lt Charles S.Bayha,  CP from the crew of J.V.DePlanque. He became a POW.   Lt Harry F.Bott,  BOM from the crew of Denzil Naar.  He became a POW. Lt Willis R. McGuire, Radar Nav from the crew of L.C.Williams was KIA. Sgt.Ray U.Muffley, WG from the crew of J.A.Carroll was a POW. 

EYEWITNESS:  "A/C 44-8220 was attacked by one of six jet E/A which made a pass at the formation at 1018 hours over the target just before bombs away.  The #1 engine was hit and burst into flames.  Bomb bay doors were closed and the aircraft slid away to the left.  The left wing crumpled and the aircraft flipped over on it's     back and exploded.  The fuselage broke at the waist door and both wings fell away.  One chute was seen to leave the aircraft before it exploded.  Later  four (4) others were counted.  Pilot was seen in cockpit 30 seconds prior to the explosion."

Charles S. Bayha wants to set the record straight about his last mission before becoming a POW. Flying formation control officer in the tail of JACK DEPLANQUE's crew, he counted eight Fortresses that went down in flames, although the combat report said twelve. He witnessed the "pancaking" of two B-17's, "a very spectacular sight." After that mission, Chuck returned to the base and "the biggest glass of whiskey and grapefruit juice I had ever had." He then flew 17 more missions with Deplanque's crew. (Hamburg mission critique Dec 31, 1944, pancake was McNab and Rojohn-mpf)

It was when he was asked to substitute for a sick co-pilot on JACK THRASHER's crew, destined to be first over the target, 
that he went down. "My logic was to get an extra mission and then wave to my crew on their last mission," he explains. When 
Thrasher's crew was forced to bail out, Chuck was trapped and passed out. When he was blown free by the plane's explosion, 
his chute was pulled. Chuck was still unconscious. Either he acted from force of habit in drills, or "you could say God's invisible hand entered into it. I believe It," Chuck concludes.

***************************************************************************************************************

LT CHARLIE  BENYUNES

TWELVE O'CLOCK LOW or WHERE DID ALL THE EXTRA MAPS COME FROM

This is no heroic war story and though it was very serious business at the time, the event took place long enough ago to laugh about now. The facts are a little fuzzy now, but as best I recall, it all came about like this with a little fiction here and there for color.

It was a rather routine briefing for a mission that stretched our fuel supply to the limit. Weather was marginal and it was one of those on-again off-again missions that had us lugging our gear back and forth from the tent to the plane several times before we finally received the "go" signal. As navigator, I went over my personal check list as we taxied out for takeoff and, much to my surprise, discovered that I had left my brief case with all - and I do mean all - of the mission maps in the tent. I promptly advised the pilot who, in turn, contacted the tower requesting permission to return to the hard stand to pick up the brief case or to have someone bring it to the plane. By this time we were number three in line for takeoff. Permission was denied and we were ordered to take off "mapless" ... I presumed to preserve the integrity of the takeoff schedule ... and, at the time, I assumed that we would takeoff, return to base after everyone else was airborne, pick up the maps, and rejoin the group. Big Laugh! Little did I know that you just don't do that - land with a full load of fuel and bombs, that is. So off we go into the wild blue yonder with no serious concern since, as element lead, we simply had to follow the lead of the squadron leader. All went well until just after "bombs away" when, as fate would have it, head winds were greater than briefed, we lost power in one engine, and had to drop out of the formation deep in the heart of the Third Reich.

So there I sat, fat, dumb, and mapless, waiting for the inevitable, "what is our course to base?" I had to come up with something. Reasoning that if we had, in fact, bombed Germany (I had no way of knowing - we had been over clouds all the way), England had to be somewhere to the west - this, I believe, is referred to a "dead-reckoning" - or is it? So, when the request did come, I responded meekly with what we in the trade call a "temporary heading" in the general northwesterly direction of the bomber stream that was now beginning to fade into the horizon as we slowly dropped back.

It was then that the cheese got binding. Almost 100% cloud cover, no radar, losing altitude, insufficient fuel to reach England, no maps and only Ol' Charlie and his little E6B to save the day. Then, recalling a previous experience, I remembered that there was a map of sorts in my escape kit. It was designed for escape and evasion on the ground, but it did, however, depict some topography and was better than no map at all.  

As we continued westward, losing altitude and depleting our fuel supply along the way, there appeared to be a few breaks in the clouds up ahead. Again, recalling a previous experience; when in doubt, forget the little stuff - it will only confuse you look for something really significant - a river, a lake, Mt Kilimanjaro, any major topographical feature that you could positively identify. Looking ahead at 12 o'clock low, there it was ... a beautiful blue lake nestled in the hills just like the one located about 30 miles WNW of Koblenz on my escape map. Though I couldn't see Koblenz because of the cloud cover, everything else on the map indicated that this just had to be that lake - a beautiful sight I will forever remember.

Confident now of our position and nearing friendly territory, I gave the pilot a more precise heading only to learn that our situation had worsened and that we would be forced to land somewhere on the continent. Under these circumstances, the pilot radioed ahead in the clear, outlining our situation and requesting a heading for an emergency landing. Almost instantly and in a perfect British accent, there came a response with a heading that by my reckoning, would most surely take us over the valley of the Ruhr and ultimately to a welcome mat at some Stalag Luft for the duration.

Drawing on the confidence of at last knowing our position, I mustered the courage to express my suspicion that the vector given was most probably from the Hun and suggested that we ignore it, continue on our present heading for another ten minutes, and then repeat the request when we were closer to friendly territory. This we did and to our delight, the second heading was genuine, took us to a P-47 base in Belgium (I think) where we landed safely, drank champagne with the fighter pilots, enjoyed a good meal, had a brief visit to a nearby village for a little sport, and got a good night's sleep before repairing the aircraft, refueling and heading for home the next day. But there was no big band to welcome 01' Charlie - the one and only navigator to successfully complete a High Altitude Deep Penetration Long Range Heavy Bombardment Mission to the very heart of The Fatherland entirely from memory and without navigation maps. Never mind that it took two days with a stopover in Belgium for a champagne party along the way. I could envision at least a DFC - maybe even a Distinguished Navigation Cross. But it was not to be.

As it turned out, the Wing Commander or someone in the chain of command above our Group Commander was monitoring our frequency during the entire "takeoff with no maps" episode and when the directive from higher Headquarters arrived, it was crystal clear that, from that day on, there would always be an extra set of maps (or charts - I can never remember exactly what it was that I left in that tent) in every Eighth Air Force aircraft. And, to this day, I still don't know why my CO spared me the trip behind the woodshed. Maybe it had something to do with why I was a first lieutenant for eleven years? But I somehow survived to retire a full colonel and so ends the saga of how the extra set of maps just happened to be in every plane.

01' Charlie "The Navigator" ( BENYUNES)

CREW

Lt.  Albert A. Prestholdt                               Pilot  CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr.
Lt.   John W. Hard                                Co-Pilot  CPT 15 April 1945   Royan, Fr.
Lt.  Robert E. Kirby                                Navigator FEH Became Lead Navigator after 5-10 Missions
S/Sgt. Orval Seifers                          Waist Gunner CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr. ( moved to Toggelier when Kirby left crew)
T/Sgt  Jack W. Marsh                              Engineer CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr.
T/Sgt.  David C. Reynolds                  Radio Operator CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr.
S/Sgt. Paul  E. Hall                               Ball Turrett CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr.
S/Sgt. Arnold L. Jaberg                     Waist Gunner CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr.
S/Sgt. Vesper N. Maxted                        Tail Gunner CPT 15 April 1945  Royan, Fr. (nicknamed "Kansas Kid")

Crew assigned to 100th BG, 418th Squadron, Nov 5. 1944.  Crew flew 35 missions.  Finished tour in A/C 48616 LD-Z
Had to crash land 3 times due to battle damage. Once at Thorpe Abbotts (31/12/44) and twice in Belgium.

The Bombardier for the crew was taken off before they were assigned overseas.  He was eventually killed in an accident in Tampa Florida when the pilot lined up on the wrong runway.  Lt Prestholdt used fill in Bomb for the remainder of his tour.  F/O Charlie Benyunes flew some missions as Navigator with this crew.  Nav. Lt Kirby was the last to join the crew in Tampa. The crew was together for 3 1/2 months before being assigned overseas.  (Albert Angus Prestholdt mpf 2001)
**************************************************************************************************************

CREW(Stanley P. Carson with this crew at Hamburg)

        A/C #43-38215  MACR #11364, MICRO-FICHE #4182

2nd Lt Billy B.Blackman          P  POW 31/12/44 HAMBURG
2nd Lt Robert E.Freshour    CP     KIA 31/12/44 HAMBURG 
2nd Lt Michael V.Repole    BOM  CPT 15/4/45 ROYAN
2nd Lt Wiilliam M.Sterrett   NAV POW  31/12/44 HAMBURG
Cpl Robert E.Fortney         ROG  KIA  31/12/44 HAMBURG
Cpl Joseph T.Pearl             TTE   KIA 31/12/44 HAMBURG
Cpl Byron W.Nelson           BTG  NOC
Cpl Basil Numack               TG     KIA  31/12/44 HAMBURG
Sgt Thomas C.Pace        WG   POW 31/12/44  HAMBURG
Cpl Andrew M. Herbert, JR   NG/TOG  POW 31/12/44 HAMBURG

418th Sqdn. Crew,as above,joined 100th Group on 5 OCT 1944 and were on their 14th mission..

On this final mission, S/Sgt Stanley P.Carson was aboard as a BTG AND WAS KIA ...S.O.C. lists him as an TTE. he was from the crew of 
J.V.DePlanque and was apparently replacing Byron W. Nelson. 
        See S.C.C. p.87 and Sqdn. Diary for Dec.1944.

EYEWITNESS:  "A/C 215 sustained a direct flak hit on the #2 engine which began to smoke and finally stopped. E/A began to attack #125 as it began to lag.  One engine burst into flames and a moment later the aircraft exploded. one (1) chute was seen"

From Lt. Blackman:  "As soon as we were hit the whole right wing caught fire.  I immediately rang the bail out bell and the toggalier and bombardier (could be referring to the Navigatot (Lt . William M. STerrett)....pw) went out the front escape hatch.  The plane then blew up, throwing Tom Pace (Thomas C. Pace), the waist gunner and myself clear.  The pieces of the aircraft hit about forty (40) miles toward the 
sea from Hamburg.

*************************************************************************************************************
Letter from Harold Smith to Cindy Goodman, June 9, 2008

I entered the service July 8, 1940 and was discharged August 8th, 1945. After working in the supply department attached to the air force, I tried out being a glider pilot. That program was disbanded so the next stop was to try to become a liaison pilot. I completed that but on a check ride a Lt. Black decided I wasn’t good enough to move on. My instructor was upset and tried to change his mind, but he failed. I found out later they didn’t need all the class so some of us had to go. I was hurt because I really wanted to fly.

I decided to go to gunner school and then get on a bomber so I could still fly. I completed school and then was assigned to a B-17 crew. As it all turned out, our crew finished our training and was sent to England. We ended up with the 100th Bomb Group. 

I flew 28 missions over Germany. Our crew did not stay the same because we became a lead crew and we had different people flying with us. Our only member that we lost was Raymond C. Kowalski who was flying with another crew that was shot down over Hamburg. I remember the whole crew that was lost. I enjoy reading Splasher Six because it helps us to remember that old friends are still around and God has blessed us with a wonderful family. I am glad that I was a part of WWII, and I pray for those who are in service now so that we can keep our nation free. God bless America. Harold Smith

**************************************************************************************************************
TAPS:
Kenneth Leroy Crispin
   
1925 - 2009
 
Nov. 16, 1925 - March 25, 2009

On Wednesday, March 25, 2009, Kenneth Leroy Crispin, 83, left us, his family, to forever stand in the presence of our Lord. Kenny was the only child to Kenneth and Gladys Crispin, born Nov. 16, 1925, in Washington, Pennsylvania, and moved here to the Conejo Valley in 1932.

At the age of 13 Kenny helped his dad, a delivery milk truck driver for Holloway Dairy, here in Thousand Oaks, deliver milk all throughout the Conejo Valley, Agoura and Moorpark. Among those deliveries were Joel McCrea and Shirley Temple. Kenny was also known to be a great help with the Louis Golbol's Lion Farm. in Thousand Oaks, which was later to be turned into Jungle Land. Around the year of 1940, Kenny set a county record in the 100 yard dash finishing in 10.3 seconds for Oxnard High School.

In 1955 Kenny owned the Conejo Valley Inn in Newbury Park. After many years he went on to open and manage DuPars in Thousand Oaks. Kenny went on from there to be the last owner/operator of the well known Redwood Lodge, which went on to be known as "Kennys Redwood Lodge". Being known as a very famous place here in Thousand Oaks, and all of Ventura County. Kenny had many, many friends here and was known for his quick sense of humor and his beautiful bright smile, touching peoples lives in only the way Kenny can. He was loved by so many people. He truly was one of the best kind of friends you would want in your corner. Kenny loved spending time on the computer, sending and receiving silly jokes and playing poker with all his poker pals.

Kenny your great big smile will forever be a part of all our lives. We love you, we will miss you, but we will never forget you.

Military service, World War II and Korean War: he enlisted during World War II, Dec. 1943 in the Army/Air Force, and flew 30 combat missions, B17 Aircraft with the 100th Bombardment Group, as tail/waist gunner, Euopean theatre of operations. His aircraft was shot/forced down twice during thes missions in Belgium both times. Although Kenny was uninjured, he received his honorable discharge October 1945. He was awarded the EAME Theater Medal, Air Medal with 4 OLC, and Good Conduct Medal, as Tech-Sgt rank. Kenny then re-enlisted March 1948 in which was now U.S. Air Force. He proceeded to log another 30 missions on B-79 aircraft during the Korean Conflict. Based in Okinawa, Japan, Kenny was awrded the Korean Service Medal, Far East Air Force Operations, March 1951 5th Oak Leaf Ouster Medal, May 1951, honorably discharged March 1952. Kenny and his father were both race car drivers and operated a separate garage in Gardena, Calif., upon Kenny's return from Korea. Kenny raced midget and sprint cars for J.C. Agajanian, Ascot Motor Speedway, in Artesia area of Southern California. In fact, his official God-parents were noted as the famous racing families, Bettehausen's and Vukovich's, and as interesting aside, Kenny traded his last race car for his first house, back in the Conejo Valley, in 1955.

Kenny was preceded in death by his parents, Kenneth L. and Gladys Crispin; and grandson, Christopher. He leaves behind his beloved and devoted wife, Jennifer Ellison Moss Crispin; twin sons, Karl and Keith, Brian, Patrick, Dennis; and daughters, Sherri, Laura, Shannon, Rick and Kathryn; eighteen grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. As a child, Kenny attended Conejo School on Conejo School Road, as did his twin sons and three granddaughters. Kenny and Jeni loved swimming and lounging by the pool, going on road trips to Las Vegas and Laaughlin and to entertain family and friends. Kenny will be missed by all but never ever forgotten, because he is "Our Kenny."

Service will be Saturday, April 4th, at 1 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 1250 Erbes Road, Thousand Oaks, with reception immediately following, at 200 Conejo School Road, Thunderbird Oaks Mobile Home Park, 2501 Thunderbird Drive, at the clubhouse.

MEMO 2:

From J.V. DePlanque Crew, he replaced Ernst F. Coble Jr. on Jack Thrasher Crew on mission.

KIA / MIA / EVA / INT INFORMATION:

TARGET: Brunswick DATE: 1945-03-03  
AIRCRAFT: (44-8220) CAUSE: EAC  

BURIAL INFORMATION

PLOT: ROW:  
GRAVE: CEMETERY:  
ID: 273